• An abstract highlights the key points of the full work in one paragraph (typically) in the following order:
  • The question(s) you looked into In the first or second sentence, define the aim very clearly.
  • The experimental design and methodologies employed to communicate the study’s core design clearly.
  • Without going into too much depth, name or quickly describe the methodology utilized, making sure to include the essential techniques.
  • The most important findings, such as significant quantitative results or patterns, present those findings that answer the questions you were asking, that identify trends, relative change or differences, and so on.
  • A brief explanation of your findings and conclusions.
  • elliptical or incomplete phrases,
  • long background information,
  • allusions to other works,
  • elliptical or unfinished phrases,
  • acronyms or terms that may be confusing to readers,
  • any type of image, figure, or table, or references to them
  • Set the context for the task being reported. This is done by reviewing relevant primary research literature (with citations) and summarizing our present understanding of the topic you’re looking into.
  • In the form of the hypothesis, topic, or problem you explored, state the aim of the study; and,
  • Explain your reasoning and strategy, as well as the probable consequences of your research, as briefly as possible.
  • the organism(s) investigated (plant, animal, human, etc.) and, if applicable, their pre-experiment handling and care, as well as when and where the study was conducted (only if location and time are critical elements); It’s worth noting that the term “subject” is only applied to human research.
  • Provide a description of the research site, including major physical and biological aspects, as well as the specific location (latitude and longitude, map, etc.)
  • if you conducted a field study; the experimental OR sample design (i.e., how the experiment or study was constructed. Controls, treatments, what variable(s) were assessed, how many samples were collected, replication, the data’s final form, and so on);
  • the data collection protocol, i.e., how the experimental procedures were carried out and how the data were analyzed (qualitative analyses and/or statistical methods were utilized to assess significance, data transformations were employed, what probability was used to evaluate significance, etc.).
  • To back up your argument, use in-text citations.
  • Unless it is required for a discussion of the research’s general implications, do not repeat the material you gave in the results or the introduction.
  • When completing your final proofreading, double-check that the reference list items match the in-text citations (i.e., no missing or conflicting information).
  • A hanging indent is used in several citation formats, and they can be alphabetized. Use the styles in Microsoft Word to help you format your citations.
  • This part is not commonly found in published studies.
  • Check whether your journal permits extra data before submitting, and don’t include any vital information in this area.
  • raw data
  • maps (foldout type especially)
  • extra photographs
  • diagrams of specialized apparati.

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store